This week in Solar: Australia’s 2030 target set to reach 48%

Here are some solar news stories you may have missed this week:

This week in solar

1. Taylor changes tune: Australia to reach 48% renewables by 2030

Energy Minister Angus Taylor has confirmed that Australia is on its way to hit nearly 50% renewables share by 2030…With no mention of the widely-reported massive drop in renewable energy investment, Taylor hailed 2019 as a new record year for renewables in Australia.

2. Solar generation is being buffeted by financial headwinds that are killing investment

New solar farms are often suffering from the remoteness of their location from the grid, as well as unpredictability in generation

3. Morrison urged to act as ARENA funding about to be exhausted

A leading think tank has called on the Morrison government to extend the funding of the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA), as the agency edges towards faces a funding cliff that may see Australian funding for clean tech renewable energy research and development dry up.

4. Big US utility says “near-firm renewables” soon to be cheaper than fossil fuels

The CEO of US-based clean energy company NextEra Energy says wind and solar projects co-located with battery storage – so-called “near-firm renewables” – will be cheaper to operate than most fossil fuel-powered plants by 2025.

5. How a Tesla Model 3 became safe haven in Australian bushfires

“Tesla was brilliant. In a disaster, both power and petrol are rapidly unavailable. When power is restored, fuel is hard to come by,” Thorpe said, recounting the experience in Facebook group “Electric Vehicles for Australia”.

6. QLD’s big battery a step closer to power up

Once the battery is connected to the grid, it will power up at Bohle Plains on Townsville’s northern outskirts, providing valuable back-up power supply to the local community.

7. South Australia encourages rooftop solar and battery storage in new homes

The state government has now made available the $100 million home battery scheme to new homes, and will allow 12 months – rather than the standard 6 months – for the battery to be installed to take into account the longer lead times of home construction.

8. Long-weekend read: PV pulls water from thin air

As Australia’s reservoirs and catchments form a crust and the plastic used to transport bottled  drinking supplies proliferates in the environment faster than bubbles in a bath … an Arizona-based company is using solar energy to process water from the troposphere — a constantly renewing airborne reservoir — and provide perfect drinking water at a tap close to people’s parched lips. Glass optional.

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