Spain is Working Hard to Achieve 100% Renewable Energy

Acciona committed roughly $68.69 million into five manufacturing facilities in 2015 to expand its production of wind turbines and achieve its goal.

The streets of Pamplona, Spain become filled with positive energy every July as thousands of tourists flock to the city in the famous running of the bulls. But if the Spanish company Acciona meets its goal, 100% of all the country’s energy could soon come from the city which is increasingly known as a hot spot for renewable energy as reported by ibtimes.com. Acciona committed roughly $68.69 million into five manufacturing facilities in 2015 to expand its production of wind turbines and achieve its goal. The company accounts for 70% of Spain’s renewable electricity. According to Miguel Ezpeleta, Acciona’s control centre director, they think the people are going to tell him he’s crazy, but they are pretty sure that they will arrive at 100%. At one point in November of last year, Acciona’s wind energy provided 70% of Spain’s electrical needs. A daytime record was achieved last January, when 54% of Spain’s electricity use was powered by wind. At their Pamplona control centre and headquarters, large screens allow Acciona employees to zoom in on its wind turbines and determine where to place blades or if maintenance are required. This enables employees to predict and forecast wind patterns to get the most amount of energy production possible. As many experts have said, wind is unpredictable, but on any given day, the 9,500 state-of-the art wind turbines controlled Acciona generate enough energy to provide power to more than 29 million households. Without having gas, oil and very little coal, the Spanish government has invested heavily in wind and solar energy. Spain has become the first country to rely on wind energy as its primary source of energy in 2013. The Spanish government has seen success on the Spanish island of El Hierro in the Canary Islands. This is where the $100 million wind and water turbine farm Gorona del Viento power plant generates all of the island’s energy requirements. This makes the island the world’s first energy independent island in 2014. Spain is the 5th largest producer in the world of wind power and the 3rd biggest exporter, according to Science X. 17.4% of Spain’s energy comes from renewable sources currently, just short of the European Union target. Click here to read the story on ibtimes.com Featured Image Credit: Drew

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Written by Jon Capistrano

Jon specialises in research and content creation for our outreach campaigns. He’s worked as a technical support representative for Dell, America Online, Xbox and Dodo Australia. He’s an avid scooterist and musician.

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