Bill Nye Gives Support for Revolutionary Solar Company

Jon Capistrano
Jon Capistrano
October 20, 2016

Bill Nye “The Science Guy” is considered one of the coolest guys in the science world. Now, Bill Nye is turning his attention to a new solar technology that could cut the cost of panels by 60% according to Inhabitat. 

Rayton Solar has devised a system that cuts Float Zone Silicone, a critical component of solar panels, with a particle accelerator. The groundbreaking technique results in less waste and lower cost, making solar power more financially competitive than traditional fossil fuels.

Solar panels are basically made with silicon, but the usual process to cut silicon results in a lot of waste. By using a particle accelerator, Rayton Solar uses 50 to 100 times less silicon than other industrial processes. As silicon is the most expensive ingredient of a solar panel, Rayton Solar’s process grants them to make solar panels that are 605 cheaper. The type of silicon they cut makes a difference too, because Float Zone Silicon is the highest grade and the type NASA uses on their projects.

According to Rayton Solar CEO and founder, Andrew Yakub wants to make the renewable energy cost-effective without subsidies. He also said that with their process, subsidies are not required for solar energy to be the most affordable source of energy.

Bill Nye compared the current climactic moment in history to that of when oil took over coal as the primary source of energy a century ago. He said that humanity is standing on the cusp of a new era in which the paradigm for energy is changing. The opportunity to support a disruptive solar technology represents a path to enabling change to a renewable future and an investment with very promising economic prospects.

Click here to read the story on Inhabitat

Featured Image Credit: Inhabitat.com

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